Top Brexit supporter backs no confidence in May
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A leader of the pro-Brexit faction in Britain's Conservative Party has confirmed that he's filed a letter of no-confidence in British Prime Minister Theresa May and that he thinks former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson would be a strong candidate to replace her. Speaking outside Parliament, Jacob Rees-Mogg said he expected enough letters to be sent to the committee that oversees Conservative leadership elections to trigger a challenge to May's leadership.

Under party rules, a no-confidence vote takes place if 15 percent of Conservative lawmakers write to the 1922 Committee asking for one. That number stands at 48.

Rees-Mogg's letter is likely to spur others to do the same, especially from the European Research Group of Brexit-supporting backbenchers that he leads.

Rees-Mogg identified former Johnson and former Brexit Secretary David Davis as potential leaders, among others. He said a leadership contest could take place in weeks.

Authorities in Gibraltar are welcoming the draft Brexit deal between Britain and the European Union, saying it makes no concessions to Spain's claims on the tiny outcrop at the tip of the Iberian Peninsula.

Meanwhile, ore ministers have quit the British government, piling pressure on embattled Prime Minister Theresa May. Junior Brexit Minister Suella Braverman and Anne-Marie Trevelyan, a junior education minister, have quit. They follow Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab and Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey.

All are staunch supporters of Brexit and say the deal agreed between Britain and the bloc does not deliver the firm break with the EU that voters chose in a 2016 referendum.

May says the deal honors the referendum result while also maintaining close ties with the EU, Britain's main trading partner. But her ability to get it through Parliament — and to remain as prime minister — are now in doubt.

A second British Cabinet minister has resigned in protest at Prime Minister Theresa May’s proposed Brexit deal with the European Union.

Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey quit, saying the deal “does not honor the result of the referendum” in which Britain voted to leave the EU.

She resigned an hour after Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab also quit, saying he could not “in good conscience” support the deal.

The resignations leave May's Brexit deal, and her leadership of the Conservative Party, in peril.

The pound has fallen sharply after Britain's Brexit minister resigned from the government, saying he did not agree with the deal the country had struck with the European Union over the terms of its departure next March.

The currency dropped 1 percent, a relatively large decline for an established currency, to $1.2870 within minutes of a tweet by Dominic Raab saying he “cannot in good conscience support the terms proposed for our deal with the EU.”

Prime Minister Theresa May faces a political backlash over the deal, which is considered insufficient by Brexit backers as well as those who wanted to remain in the EU. Parliament needs to approve the deal and it is unclear whether May has the numbers to push it through.

May, who had persuaded a majority of her cabinet to back the deal, is addressing lawmakers Thursday morning.

Britain’s Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab has resigned, saying he “cannot in good conscience support the terms proposed for our deal with the EU.”

The resignation is a big blow to Prime Minister Theresa May, who is due to address lawmakers later this morning on the draft Brexit deal. She is already facing an uphill struggle to convince enough lawmakers in Parliament to accept the agreement with the European Union.

May made some major concessions to the EU to achieve the deal: Britain, for example, will remain tied to the European Union’s customs union during the transition period and potentially for much longer.