Editorial

Editorial

Transforming healthcare

While India has several healthcare achievements to its credit, including the eradication of small pox in 1977, the triumph over polio in 2014, maternal and neonatal tetanus in 2015 and YAWS in 2016, its 1.3 billion strong population continues to suffer from one of the world’s worst burdens of disease. There is a perceptible rise in non-communicable diseases with ischemic heart stroke leading the list of directly attributable causes at 12 per cent of the population.

Trump’s ‘adults in the room’ should stay there

Working for the White House is always tough, and working for president Donald “You’re Fired” Trump must be a nightmare. He repeatedly undermines his cabinet secretaries — criticising them in public, blindsiding them with impulsive policy changes, and far too often ignoring their advice.

It’s surprising that competent people can put up with it — and, contrary to a popular line of thinking, very much in the country’s interest that they should.

Building up BRICS

The countries constituting the BRICS have come a long way since the coining of the BRIC abbreviation by Jim O’ Neil (Goldman Sachs) in 2001. This acronym triggered the seeds of partnership among the BRIC, facilitating the metamorphosis into a unique cooperation mechanism with a potentially transformative impact on the global economy, given the sheer economic and political weight of these countries.

What women need

Women, worldwide, have long been oppressed, suppressed, discriminated, exploited and prejudiced against in all spheres of corporate and personal life.  History is replete with instances where the women have given way for men to achieve greater glory, prosperity and stardom while recusing themselves to household chores to nurture, raise and protect a family.

The sabarimala conundrum

The five-judge Constitutional bench led by the Chief Justice of India, Justice Deepak Mishra is in the process of hearing the Sabarimala case, with respect to entry of women between the ages of 10 and 50.

This issue throws open a very interesting debate regarding the balance that needs to be found between a person’s fundamental rights which are enshrined in the Constitution, and custom and usages that prevail in our society today.

Both these set of rights have great importance in the legal and constitutional perspective.

Inject some awareness

Hepatitis B is a major viral infection that affects about 40 million people in India. What makes it worse is the fact that once infected, there is high risk of long term infection. If we go by the latest data by the National Family Health Survey (NFHS 4), about 60 per cent of children receive the hepatitis B vaccine within a year of birth. With more than one-third of our children vulnerable to the infection, hepatitis B is a threat to public health across the nation.

The flip-flops of Trump

In the meeting of US president Trump with Russian president Putin in July 2018 in Helsinki, immediately after organising Football World Cup, Putin seems to have scored a diplomatic goal over Trump in context of US accusations of Russians muddling in their elections. On return to Washington, under pressure from his critics, president Trump did a U turn to what he had said. Few days later he invited Putin for talks in Washington, despite continued economic sanctions on Russia. Such a diplomatic flip-flop and rapid changes in US policies is not the first one in his presidency.

Beware 0f digital footprint

With accessing online information and interacting with data becoming a necessity rather than a habit, it has become very easy for thieves to steal your identity and personal information and use it for nefarious purposes. Your digital identity can be misused in a plethora of ways from opening a shady bank account, siphoning off your savings and making chargeable transactions to funding criminal networks. It, therefore, stands to reason that protecting the information that you share on public platforms is of paramount importance.

Free will, et al

The BJP always believed that with the stroke of a pen they could change the fate of India. However, it is not easy to bring down institutions, which have been in existence for almost 70 years. The resilience of the Constitution depends on its versatility.

Free will, et al

The BJP always believed that with the stroke of a pen they could change the fate of India. However, it is not easy to bring down institutions, which have been in existence for almost 70 years. The resilience of the Constitution depends on its versatility.

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